Your mason bees are ready to start making food!

January 29, 2020

Your mason bees are ready to start making food!

Your mason bees are ready to start making food! 

Some of the bees grown in your backyard last year are ready to be taken to farms in California to pollinate almonds that will end up in our grocery stores.

Almonds typically start to bloom the second week of February in central California. With over 1.3 million acres of almonds, this is the largest pollination event in the entire world! During this pollination season, our farmers won't spray chemicals; they take every precaution to protect these powerful pollinators. 

Mason bees are the perfect pollinators for almonds. Since the trees bloom in February before temperatures stay above 60 degrees, the native mason bee is happy to visit the trees while honey bees prefer to stay warm in their hives on cooler days. 

If you haven't already, it's time to reserve your bee kit for spring! 

Come visit our booth at the NW Flower & Garden Show! 

February 26th- March 1st 

BEE AMAZED





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